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18 of The Worlds Most Unusual Tooth Fairy Rituals

18 of The Worlds Most Unusual Tooth Fairy Rituals.

The Weirdest Tooth Fairy Traditions From Around the World! 18 of The Worlds Most Unusual Tooth Fairy Rituals.

The tooth fairy couldn’t possibly have time to collect the teeth of every child in the world and she’d go broke if she tried. She needed a little help in other parts of the world.

Since children in other countries lose their baby teeth as well they came up with their own traditions. Some of them are ancient and will seem very weird to you. However, I bet allowing a flying fairy to sneak into your home and take your baby tooth but leaving money in it’s place would seem weird to them. To each their own but what’s with throwing teeth on the roof of your house?

Greece

Here sows (female pigs) have the honor of disposing of baby teeth. The child throws the tooth onto the roof of their house in the hope that a sow will find it. While doing this, the child chants, “Take Sow my tooth and give me an iron one so that I can chew rusks.”

Lesotho

The tooth is thrown onto the roof, in the hope that a lizard will find it and bring the child a new tooth.

Romania

The child throws the tooth onto the roof and says, “Crow, crow, take away this bone tooth and bring me a steel one.”

Jamaica

When children lose a tooth, they are warned that a calf will come to get them and the tooth…but if they put the tooth into a tin
can and shake it, the rattling noise will keep the calf at bay.

Nepal

In this country, the goal is to keep the tooth hidden from birds by burying it. If a bird sees or eats the tooth before it is buried, the
new tooth won’t grow in at all.

El Salvador

El Salvadoran kids leave their teeth under their pillows in the hope that a rabbit will take it and leave some money behind.

Sounds like a combination of the tooth fairy and the Easter Bunny.


Korea

Korean children throw their teeth onto the roof while singing, “Blackbird, blackbird, my old tooth I give to you. Bring me a new tooth.”

Cherokee (Southeastern United States)

The child runs around the house and then throws tooth onto the roof as they say four times, “Beaver put a new tooth in my jaw.”

Sri Lanka

Another country where the tooth is thrown onto the roof-in this case, in the hope that a squirrel will find it.

India

Kids throw their teeth onto the roof and ask a sparrow to bring

Mongolia

If there’s a dog handy, the child will put the tooth into a piece of fat and feed it to the dog, in the hope that the new tooth that grows in will be as strong as a dog’s tooth. If there are no dogs around, burying the tooth beside a tree will (hopefully) ensure that the new tooth has roots as strong as the tree’s. The tradition of feeding teeth to dogs has spread as far as Alaska.

Finland

Perhaps the only country with a villain who frightens kids into taking better care of their teeth, Finland has a Hammaspeikko (tooth troll) who shows up anytime children eat candy. He gives the kids cavities by drilling holes in their teeth, but they can scare him away by brushing their teeth. The Hammaspeikko tale dates only to the early 1960s, but similar tales of spirits who cause toothaches have been a part of Finnish culture for centuries.

Brazil

This country has two traditions: In some places, kids throw their tooth onto a roof and ask Saint John to bring them a new one. In others, they throw it in the yard and ask a bird to bring it.

(Parents encourage children to brush their teeth by telling them that the birds will take the lost tooth only if it doesn’t contain any cavities.)

Do you know the origins of the tooth fairy? Know the tooth fairy was a mouse first? It was, find out more here.

Egypt

In a tradition that dates back to when the ancient Egyptians worshipped the sun god Ra, the child wraps the tooth in tissue and throws it at the sun while saying, “Shiny sun, shiny sun, take this buffalo’s tooth and bring me a bride’s tooth.”

Navajo children take their tooth away from the home and bury it somewhere to the southeast, on the eastern side of a bush or tree. (The sun rises in the east, and in the Navajo culture the east is associated with childhood.)

Botswana

Children here throw their baby teeth onto the roof and ask the moon to give them a new one.

Indonesia

The child has to throw the tooth over their shoulder onto the roof…and with some skill: If they throw the tooth in a straight line onto the roof, the tooth that grows in will be straight as well. If the throw isn’t straight the tooth will grow in crooked.

Conclusion to The Weirdest Tooth Fairy Traditions From Around the World!

Well, that does it for the Weirdest Tooth Fairy Traditions From Around the World! Are you jealous of any traditions on the list? Wish you would’ve chosen them instead of placing your baby teeth under the pillow?

If you have time share this to your social media pages by clicking one of the buttons below. Until I see you again, chow!

Next find out 20 Unusually Interesting Facts about Teeth!

An Unusually Interesting Fact about the Tooth Fairy.

A visit by the tooth fairy for the baby boomer generation was on average $0.69 for the children of Generation Z it’s $4.67.

18 of The Worlds Most Unusual Tooth Fairy Rituals

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