Scientist hope to Replace Antibiotics with Fish Slime

Scientist hope to Replace Antibiotics with Fish Slime

How Scientist Are Using Fish Slime to fight Infections.

How Scientist Are Using Fish Slime to fight Infections. Scientist hope to Replace Antibiotics with Fish Slime.

Scientist hope to Replace Antibiotics with Fish Slime!


Antibiotic resistance is becoming a very serious threat. Now, Scientists are tackling the problem in a surprising new and somewhat disgusting way.

Fish “slime” refers to the protective mucus that coats the bodies of fish, shielding the fish from harmful bacteria, fungi and viruses. This slimy substance, a microbiome not unlike what we find in the human body, is also full of polysaccharides and peptides with antibacterial properties.

Fish mucus is really interesting because the environment the fish live in is complex. They are in contact with their environment all the time, with many pathogenic viruses.”

Molly Austin – Oregon State

Fish Slime Fights off Bacteria

Hagfish Slime! How Scientist Are Using Fish Slime to fight Infections.
Hagfish Slime!

Researchers found 47 different strains of bacteria in the slime, five of which effectively restricted the growth of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A very hard-to-treat staph infection or super bug, while another three bacterial extracts suppressed the fungus called Candida albicans, which leads to yeast infections. The bacteria found in the slime of the Pacific pink perch in particular was also able to stave off colon carcinoma cells.

Getting slimy goo from more than just fish!

Toad with it's tongue out. How Scientist Are Using Fish Slime to fight Infections.

Fish slime isn’t the only animal-derived sticky stuff being studied for humans. Scientists in the field of biomimicry look to nature for solutions to man’s problems. Right now, bioengineers at Georgia Tech are studying frog saliva, which is known for its almost physics-defying grip.

Frog tongues flick and catch prey in the blink of an eye, in about 0.04 seconds, but it’s the tongue’s unique glue-like quality — ability to hold onto its prey even at high speeds — that make frogs so lethal to passing insects. Biomimicry researchers hope to learn from the frog’s biology to design more effective adhesives. The slime from the Dusky Arion slug has also inspired surgical glues that work even on wet surfaces.

Expensive Snail Facials

Korean and South American beauty companies have marketed cosmetics snail slime for years. It contains proteins, glycolic acids and elastins that supposedly reduce wrinkles, boost moisture, quickly heal wounds and smooth skin. Ancient Greeks used to use the stuff to reduce skin inflammation.

These days, beauty products containing snail slime can cost hundreds of dollars. With one treatment running clients upward of $375.

Conclusion

This isn’t very surprising considering we’ve been using nature to heal our bodies for as long as we’ve been on this planet.

However, it’s good to see scientist are finally catching up to cavemen.

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